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Reentry Resource Center - New York

Serving People from Arrest to Reintegration

Reentry Resource Center: New York

Welcome to the New York State-based support network and information clearinghouse on prison, reentry, and the consequences of criminal proceedings. Attorneys, social service providers, policy advocates, individuals with criminal records, family, and community members are encouraged to join for full access to the online resource library, monthly mailings, and calendar updates. Click here for the national site.


Welcome!  Where to begin?


Download our Fully Revised and Expanded Manual on the
Consequences of Criminal Proceedings in New York


Created for defense attorneys, civil legal services attorneys, and reentry advocates the manual details hundreds of consequences in New York State that flow from a criminal arrest or conviction, and strategies for navigating them. Every section has been updated with expanded citations to case law and useful practice tips. Click here to download the manual.

 



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For National Research, Policy, and General Information visit:

Reentry Net National Library

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Contact us for more information, or to set up onsite user-training.


Resource of the Week

April 13, 2015

U.S. Prison Population Trends

This comparative analysis of recent changes in state and federal prison populations contextualizes the scale and timing of efforts to downsize prisons. Through customized measures for each jurisdiction – calculating declines since each jurisdiction's peak year, and increases in other states since 2008 – the Sentencing Project assesses the full impact of recent policy changes. The analysis reveals:

While the total U.S. prison population declined by 2.4% since 2009, incarceration trends among the states have varied significantly. Two-thirds (34) of the states have experienced at least a modest decline, while one-third (16) have had continuing rises in imprisonment.

Nine states have produced double-digit declines during this period, led by New Jersey (29% since 1999), New York (27% since 1999), and California (22% since 2006). Sixteen states, and the federal government, have had less than a 5% decline since their peak years.??
Among states with rising prison populations, five have experienced double-digit increases, led by Arkansas, with a 17% rise since 2008. While sharing in the national crime drop, these states have resisted the trend toward decarceration.

These findings reinforce the conclusion that just as mass incarceration has developed primarily as a result of changes in policy, not crime rates, it will require ongoing changes in both policy and practice to produce substantial population reductions.

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